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Kplr

KPLR

Label: DIGITALIS
Genre: ELECTRONIC
Format_dot_vinyl
Format: LP
Released: Nov 2011
Catalogue Number: DIGIV037
Tracks for: KPLR
Time
1. KPLR : 01
2. KPLR : 02
3. KPLR : 03

Boomkat product review for:

kplr - KPLR

*Edition of 500, initial copies on transparent orange vinyl. Cut at D&M, Berlin* KPLR have only gone and made the best release on Digitalis in 2011. This year we've been increasingly wowed by the stream of rogue, under-the-counter post-Techno coming out of the States and the UK. But one release in particular, KPLR's mind-bending 'Tek No Muzik' 12" for Crazy Iris stuck in the mind like a piece of dislodged solder. By taking a playfully abstract approach to hardware manipulation, unafraid of ceaseless repetition and finely attuned to the nuance of his machines, KPLR has cultivated a rare connection with electronic music which has catalysed and crystallised some of the most visceral, psycho-actively unstable sounds around. Kind of like some nerdish Magneto character with an awareness of Christina Kubisch's electro-magnetic experiments, Dexter has focussed his energies and instincts to the world of whirring mechanics and humming circuitry which surrounds his daily life. Absorbing and assimilating their timbres and characteristics, he instinctively teases out their harmonic integers and melodic infidelities thru hours of tweaky hardware sessions, morphing their quirks and quarks into mesmerising, moire-like grids recalling a wealth of material, from early Oramics to Mika Vainio's elemental inductions or Bob Ostertag's modular mazes, and all with a resonant accent and innate, esoteric sense of funk unique to KPLR. It's a vital an example of the smudged line between man-machine interfaces; a primitive yet engaging form of Borg-like dialogue between organic and inorganic systems. A massive recommendation.